NEWS


Our Blog

Attorney information, tips, and news.

Modesto History

By Christopher

Modesto – the Modest City

Strange as it may seem, there is one city in California which takes its name from the modesty of its pioneers and the people of Modesto have tried to live up to the reputation ever since . . .

In 1871, Modesto was voted the county seat of Stanislaus County and from then on its permanency as the trading center of the county was assured. In 1884 it was incorporated and in the same year steps were taken to organize irrigation districts to supply water for the surrounding lands which were devoted to grain growing and cattle. But it was not until 1904 that the long fight for irrigation was won and the irrigation works completed.

From 1904 colonization and development has been rapid and Modesto as the metropolis has grown with the County. The population in 1910 was 4,034 and ten years later it had doubled to 9,241. In the next decade to 1930 Modesto while not equaling this record made the greatest growth of any city in Northern California or 49% to 13,842. Then in 1940, the population was again increased to 16,830.
Modesto today is famed for several things. In addition to its arched sign . . . the city has the national record for the highest per capita retail trade for cities above 10,000 population. The figure given y the U. S. Dept. of the Census is $1,200 per inhabitant which is twice the average for the State of California. It also pays the highest sales tax per capita of any city in California above 10,000 further substantiating the claim of being a rich trade center.

It boasts of a championship band that has won the State championship five years in a row and the second place in the national contests twice. The city has a full symphony orchestra of 80 pieces. No financial institutions failed in the city during the depression and the business failures amounted to less than one per cent.
There is a Junior College with close to 1000 students registered which turned out a conference championship football team last year.

All credit for the article belongs to, http://www.historicmodesto.com/1940smodesto.html

Tire Safety Tips from Experts

By Christopher

Tires are an important part of your car, and when they are properly maintained they can help us avoid a car wreck. Tire maintenance must be taken seriously, as there are around 11,000 reported crashes caused by unsafe tires each year, and around 200 people are killed in those wrecks. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reports many of those crashes are avoidable with proper maintenance and reading tire labels. Motorists should also track their tire’s age and keep a close eye on recalls. Residents can help keep their tires safe and experts urge them to help keep their loved ones informed about tire safety, as well. Car owners should check their tire pressure at least once a month, and preferably after the car hasn’t been driven for 2 hours. There is also a higher risk of a blowout or tread separation if a tire gets too worn. Spare tires are also susceptible to aging and safety issues. The vehicle’s owner manual should be reviewed to determine when tire rotations, alignment, and balancing is necessary. These procedures will help the tires last as long as possible. If a driver notices their vehicle pulling to one side on even, flat road, bring the vehicle to an alignment expert as soon as possible, according to news reports. Contact our Modesto law offices to talk to an attorney today.

Farm Safety Group Campaigns for Child Safety

By Christopher

A campaign was announced by a farm safety group to keep children under the age of 12 off of tractors. The safety campaign was introduced by the Childhood Agricultural Safety Network. According to officials, a child is killed due to farm injuries every 3.5 days and tractors are the leading cause of these deaths. Tractors are a factor in 40% of all farm deaths for children under the age of 15, as well, according to a youth safety specialist with the National Farm Medicine Center. Many children will ride a tractor alone or with family members on a regular basis. A parent may let their infant ride along with them, or an older sibling may partake in farm work. However, parents are reminded it is very easy for a child to be thrown from a tractor, even if it doesn’t overturn. Actions such as hitting holes, sharp turns, or sudden stops can cause riders to lose their grip. A child can also be very distracting to adults driving a tractor. The risk of an accident for the adult increases if there is a child involved, according to a youth safety specialist for the National Children’s Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety. Riding a tractor is also considered a tradition for children in rural area, although there are many accident reports including a toddler who fell of a tractor operator’s lap and was crushed. Officials urge parents to never let a child to ride on a tractor due to the high risk of injury or death.

There are many tragedies involving children and tractors. Riding in a cab is not necessarily safer. A child was killed after grabbing a handle for support when a tractor hit a bump, causing him to fall from the cab. Children must complete a safety course and reach a mature enough age before they are allowed to ride on a tractor. Children must not be allowed to drive a tractor until they turn 14 or 15, experts say. Children still don’t have the ability understand their environment, which is crucial for avoiding a potentially fatal accident. Children can’t judge speed, distance, and movement as well as other adults. Small farms are not required to report workplace injuries which involved children, so many injuries go unreported. Across the United States, 38 children are seriously hurt on farms each day in the US. Injuries involving children under the age of 10 are also on the rise. Child labor laws also don’t apply to family farms if the children working are also members of the family, according to news reports. Call our Stockton law offices for more info.

Our $370,000.00 recovery for a client involved in a minor motor vehicle accident

By Christopher

Our client was the passenger in a car that was involved in a minor car accident. He bumped his knee on the dash board. Within two days, it had started to swell, so he went to his doctor who aspirated it. Within a week, he contracted a Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection inside the knee. He was told by his doctors that he would someday need a knee replacement after they cleared up the infection, and that the infection caused the need for such surgery. The defendant argued that a minor accident can’t lead to such a catastrophic injury, but they ultimately paid $370,000.00. View our car accidents page here for more info.

Our recovery for a client who was intoxicated at the time of accident

By Christopher

Our client, a young woman in her 20’s, went with her friend to pick up a motorized scooter from the retailer who sold it. The friend asked the salesman  for some operating instructions. The salesman pointed to a store employee saying he was the expert on scooters. This employee was off duty at the time, and was only in the store to pick up his paycheck. However, he agreed to instruct them and he put the new scooter in his truck along with his scooter. He said that there was a nearby parking lot where she could practice. On the way there, he suggested that they stop for some food. They picked up a pizza, a six pack of beer and a half pint of Jameson’s whiskey. The three of them ate and drank and the off-duty employee taught the friend how to ride the scooter. Afterward, he offered to instruct our client, who declined. She had already drank two beers. He insisted that she try, and when she did, she crashed, breaking her jaw. The store’s insurance company argued that they had no liability because the employee was off duty and because our client was intoxicated. The case went to arbitration and the arbitrator found that even though the employee was off duty, the store was legally responsible for his actions because the salesman who sold the scooter recommended him to give the lesson. As for our client’s intoxication, we argued that, just as Mr. Miyagi said in “The Karate Kid”: “No such thing bad student. Only bad teacher. Teacher say. Student do.” Our client never anticipated riding the scooter, she was only having some beer with her pizza. The off duty employee, the teacher, was the one who suggested it. The arbitrator agreed with our position and awarded $90,000.00. Visit our car accident page to get in touch.

Highest medical malpractice verdict in Santa Clara County in 11 years

By Christopher

Our client was in her mid-eighties living in her own home and acting as the primary caregiver to her husband who suffered form Parkinson’s Disease. She care for her garden, drove a care, shopped for groceries and cleaned her own home. In a word, she was independent. Over the course of several weeks her doctor failed to address persistent complaints of headaches and blurry vision. A short time later, she became totally and permanently blind. Her doctor had failed to diagnose her condition, temporal arthritis, which is an inflammation of the arteries that supply blood to the eyes. Evelyn went to a layer who took the case and then after months of no progress, dropped it. She consulted other lawyers who were not interested in her case. They said she was too old to get a large verdict and winning medical malpractice cases was too hard anyway. Finally, she came to us, and we agreed to represent her. She received the highest medical malpractice verdict in Santa Clara County in the previous 11 years! Click here to return to home page.