43% of All Fatal Falls Involve Ladders


43% of all fatal falls in the US involve a ladder, recent reports revealed. Approximately 20% of all fall injuries involve ladders, for instance. Researchers gathered data from 2011 in order to determine that work-related ladder falls resulted in 113 fatalities, and 15,500 injuries in the US. Injuries resulted in at least one day away from work. 34,000 injuries were also treated in the emergency room. Workers with the highest risk of injury included older employees, men, Hispanics, construction workers, installation, maintenance, repair, and extraction workers. A primary researcher said a majority of these injuries are preventable. Safety advocates, employees, healthcare professionals, and others are requested to cooperate in order to help make sure everybody involved with the job remains safe around ladders. They also think further research is required on fall prevention as a result of ladders. They also provided advice on how to prevent ladder falls from occurring. Firstly, they advise seeking ways to complete the work required without using ladders, and providing workers with alternatives to ladders, such as aerial lifts or supported scaffolds. Ladders must also be inspected to make sure safety accessories are available and they must be linked properly with the worker’s task, location, and weight. All workers should be trained while on the job, and they should be provided with necessary information on staying safe while on the job.

Safety experts also provided a check list concerning how employees and residents should safely use extension ladders. Workers should maintain a 3-point contact whenever climbing or descending a ladder, which includes using two hands and a foot, or two feet and a hand. Employees should also face the ladder whenever going up or down, and keep their body inside the side rails at all times. Ladder users should also stay careful while getting on or off a ladder, and avoid tipping the ladder. All tools should be secured inside a belt, and never carried in the ladder user’s hands while climbing up or down a ladder. Extend the top of the ladder three feet over the landing, and keep ladders free from material that may be slippery. Employees are asked to never put ladders on an unstable base that exceeds the maximum load rating for the ladder, and they shouldn’t ignore overhead power lines. Workers also shouldn’t move or shift a ladder while someone is on the ladder, and they shouldn’t lean out beyond the ladder’s side rails either, according to ladder industry news reports.

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